Folk Beliefs

  • When your nose itches, someone is thinking of you.
  • When your big toe throbs, someone is thinking about you. If it is the tow of yoru right foot, it is a man; if it is the left foot, it is a woman.
  • When yoru ears ring, someone is talking about you. IF yoru right ear rings, they are saying something nice; if it is your left ear, they are sayign something nasty.
  • When your right eye itches, something bad is going to happen.
  • When setting up a loom, be sure to lock the door. Otherwise, someoen might bring an evil foot to the weaving.
  • Envy can have a very strong effect, even up to death.
  • When eating, it is customary to offer food to anyone who sees you so as to avoid being nauseated by theri envy.
  • When sitting at a table adn talking about something you or someone near and dear to you owns, you had better knock on the underside of the table and wish that it will be yours to keep for a long time. Otherwise, something will be envious and try to take it away from you.
  • Longing for something can cause the object of longing to become sick.
  • A person’s soul might project a warning, or deliver a message without the person realizing it. The message may manifest as an image of hte person, by sound, by premonition, or in a dream. They often warn of the person’s approach, death, danger, or the like.
  • If a person meets his own soul, it is a sign he will surely die.
  • There are those who can send their spirit on journeys while they lay in trance.
  • If a woman crawls through the caul of a foal, she will give brith without pain, but her firstborn will become a mare or a werewolf.
  • Werewolves are known to attack pregnant women. IF they can tear the fetus from the womb and eat the child’s heart, it would be released from the spell.
  • When life had fled from teh body of a dying person, one opens the door just a crack. That way the soul is free to go.
  • The last wish of hte dead must be respected.
  • The weight of a coffin speaks to the condition of the person’s spirit. If it is heavy, evil epirits are sitting on it. If it is light, the spirit has already left for its new abode.
  • It can be dangerous to call a spirit by its name.
  • The dead lover often returns to bring a message, take revenge, or to respond to the grief of his beloved.
  • The dead, as well as spirits, can be pacified by honoring them in various ways, including dedicating shrines and temples to them. Enshrining a spirit does not necessarily mark a spirit as praiseworthy; it means they may be dangerous, too.
  • Sharp-edged toosl are particularly effective against the vengeful dead.
  • Sewing flax seed aroudn teh house, along the road, or around a grave is a means of protectign against revanents. Flax seed is often placed inside a casket, as well.
  • Binding a corpse and staking it to the coffin can keep it from rising again.
  • Seven is a powerful number.
  • Nine is a powerful number.
  • One should never hold the needles tha tpina shroud together between one’s teeth. The dead sorcerer could walk again or have power over the person.
  • Sticking needles in the souls of a corpse can keep it from walking again.
  • Sometimes the dead return to give advice at a moment of crisis or decision to one they care about. At times the living seek advice, callign them up or talking to them at the grave.
  • When a person dies before atoning for a wrong he or she had committed, the person does not always find peace until it is rectified.
  • Greedy people often rise as greedy revenants.
  • Suicide is dishonest. Those who commit suicide are condemned to rise as revenants for as long as they would have normally lived.
  • It is not uncommon for mishapen, weak, or undesired children to be killed. These can rise as revenants.
  • It is common to makr land ownership with boundry stones. Moving such stones is severly punished and sometimes believed to cause a person to rise as an incorporeal spirit who labors in vain to put the stone back (his hands go right through teh stone).
  • The dead are afraid of the cock’s crow.
  • Sickness is rooted in supernatural origins. Healing is accomplished by magic and rituals.
  • Magic often involves effigies and sympathies, such as a broken stick to represent a broken leg, a wax figure of a person, etc.
  • Human breathe, blood, saliva, urine, adn other bodily secretions possess healing or restorative powers.
  • Illnesses and afflictions are often personified or driven into inanimate objects in healing rituals.
  • An animal is cured of homesickness by whispering into its ear how badly things are at its old home.
  • Many seven-line rhymes exist for household use by normal people against common problems, such as wasps, snakes, rats, etc.
  • Tyign three knots in a hankerchief or rope will summon sailing winds.
  • Never cross a witch. She will take revenge.
  • Always be kind to strangers, in case they are witches.
  • Sudden sickness or death may be the result of elfshot, a magic projectile often sent by a sorcerer. It often takes the form of an arrow, insect, vaporous cloud, and so on.
  • Suddenly becomign drowsy is an omen that a person is about to be attacked with magic.
  • Iron and spit are common remedies against the demonic.
  • Spitting into the wind three times or throwing a knife into the wind will ward off whirlwinds.
  • Witches often steal milk with magic. They may steel other fluids, also. They stab a knife into a wooden post and the milk trickles from it, like sap from a tree.
  • One can test if butter was churned by a witch by stabbign into it with a knife. If the knife drips blood, it is bewitched butter.
  • Witches often create or bind familiars to themselves and use them for variosu tasks.
  • Creating a familiar requires wood shavings, hair, nails, and the like. Universially, three drops of the witch’s blood are required for the ritual.
  • Offering urine as a drink is an insult.
  • A witch’s daughter could inherit her mother’s powers and be held responcible for them.
  • White snakes possess magical properties.
  • Farm spirits defend the farm viciously.
  • “Grims” are the protective revenants of animals buried alive in teh foundations of buildings, typically of a religious nature.
  • Ships often have protective spirits, similar to nisse and tomte.
  • Mills are often enhabited by “snarls” who stop the mill from working at night.
  • Mines are inhabited by invisible folk who are led by a beautiful silver spirit known as “the silver mother” or “lady of the mine.” She helps miners find ore, but may mete out harsh punishment for abuse of her treasure.
  • Water sprites often use music or illusion to lure victims to their watery death. They are adept musicians.
  • There are many tunes that have preternatural origins.
  • Water sprites are often paid for their aid and services with a mutton leg.
  • The invisible folk are always to be treated wtih respect.
  • Water sprites can take the shape of a horse and are often called “water horses”.
  • Merfolk are sea spirits. They are human from teh waist up and fish below with horizontal tails. Catchign a merman or mermaid is considered good luck among fishermen.
  • Offerings of grain and the like are commonly made to merfolk in exchange for good luck sailing.
  • Sekie are spirit folk who have the shape of a seal but can peel off their skin to appear human. If their seal skin is lost, they must remain in their human forms.
  • Draug are men who drowned at sea.
  • Excrement adn obsceity are often used to repel the demonic.
  • There is an invisible floating island that can only be found with the aid of a pig who has ingested a piece of iron.
  • Trolls are dimwitted and hide troves of wealth underground.
  • Trolls and ogres dislike bells and are turned to stone in the sun. This explains many roughly human-shaped rock formations.

Folk Beliefs

Elyria Humabout